You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘fruit’ tag.

A chance listening to a mountain dulcimer and a string orchestra performing Connie Elisor’s Blackberry Winter (1997) played upon my imagination: it was all about paradox. Poets like T. S. Elliot and Gerard Manley Hopkins are known for such word-joinings; its experience, in music, however, opened me to other realities.

Juxtaposing succulent blackberries with frigid winds erupted into a honied ache, a puckering of the lips, a twinge of sweetness.

Still other associations flowed: the interlude between hesitant frosts and the full coloring of spring; between the locked door and the opened door; between the angst and discovery within the creative process; between thought and action; between labor and delivery; between losing a significant other and fresh heart-healing; and between the rigors of dying and ultimate surrender: “fall, gall, gash themselves, gold-vermillion.”

It seems like our lives are a succession of blackberry winters.

Such is the glory of our humanness and when overwhelmed, let us not lose heart in our Composer who resides within. Change always comes if we allow it.

 

 

Whenever we sound the depths of people, places, and things, we invariably find a significant story. This is true of peaches. Among summer’s fruits, peaches always evoke the “Ah!” response; their downy skins, their swaggering blush, their rousing aroma, and their candied taste engorge the senses and leave us yearning for more.

Such delectable fruit originated in Northwest China in the region between the Tarim Basin and the slopes of the Kunlun Shan Mountains and dates back to 2000 BCE. Emperors and dignitaries savored peaches during festive banquets.

It’s no wonder that a myth about celestial peaches evolved over the centuries. Its central figure is XiWangmu, the Queen Mother of the West, dispenser of prosperity, longevity, and eternal bliss. In her palace garden grew peach trees, their tangled branches spanning three thousand leagues across and reaching to the heavens, affording a ladder for the gods to move between heaven and earth. However, it took three thousand years for the fruit to ripen. A long wait, indeed, but the miraculous harvest prompted XiWangmu to host a banquet for her fellow Taoist gods. The peaches became immortal, ever plentiful to seekers.

The next time you bite into a luscious peach, remember you are in special company.

 

 

medium_539852012

Whenever we sound the depths of people, places, and things, we invariably find a significant story. This is true of peaches. Among summer’s fruits, peaches always evoke the “Ah!” response; their downy skins, their swaggering blush, their rousing aroma, and their candied taste engorge the senses and leave us yearning for more.

Such delectable fruit originated in Northwest China in the region between the Tarim Basin and the slopes of the Kunlun Shan Mountains and dates back to 2000 BCE. Emperors and dignitaries savored peaches during festive banquets.

It’s no wonder that a myth about celestial peaches evolved over the centuries. Its central figure is XiWangmu, the Queen Mother of the West, dispenser of prosperity, longevity, and eternal bliss. In her palace garden grew peach trees, their tangled branches spanning three thousand leagues across and reaching to the heavens, affording a ladder for the gods to move between heaven and earth. However, it took three thousand years for the fruit to ripen. A long wait, indeed, but the miraculous harvest prompted XiWangmu to host a banquet for her fellow Taoist gods. The peaches became immortal, ever plentiful to seekers.

The next time you bite into a luscious peach, remember you are in special company.

 

 

 

medium_539852012

Available on Amazon

%d bloggers like this: